18 Years: ONE Empowering Idea for ADHD & Autism

MartinJulie_December2019This Spring marks the anniversary of ONE Empowering Idea for ADHD & Autism that’s helped countless children and families worldwide. This ONE idea, Nourishing Hope – giving specialized attention to the food and nutrition children receive to help them improve – is fueled by scientific inquiry and personal passion, and drives an evolution of thought regarding the epidemic of childhood disorders.

Nourishing Hope has become a global movement of like-minded people sharing a message of hope and healing for our children and families. Instead of simple “awareness” that autism and ADHD exists or that prevalence of increases, we aim to empower those affected with known avenues of support, helpful actions, and simple truths. 

Read about the journey below – it began with Julie’s passionate curiosity and now engages parents and health professionals around the world. ONE thing is clear – that when families embrace the concept and practice of nourishing hope – things improve. And, often for the entire family. When you behave in alignment with what you believe, the likelihood of sustaining the behavior and seeing desired results goes up immeasurably (that’s hard science).

NutrientsCoverAndPaperBecause hundreds of scientific studies identify food-related symptoms and behaviors in children with ADHD, Autism and more, and thousands of parents from around the world report that diet changes equate to measurable improvements in health, cognition, and behavior – one could argue that dietary intervention is THE most scientifically sound, proven, and safe approach to helping.

In 2018, Julie/Nourishing Hope, published “gold-standard” scientific research that validates the straightforward approach she’s been sharing. Read Julie’s blog where she explains all about “Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder—A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial,  and how nourishing hope can help you too. No further evidence is required to validate that going from NOT being calculated about Food and Nutrition intake, TO being calculated, is worthwhile.

Every person benefits from nourishing hope!

What is nourishing hope?Pencil-Girl_ONLY_200px

For those new to Nourishing Hope/Julie (and Martin) Matthews, here’s some of the back story of nourishing hope came to be.

As many recall, autism rocked the world in the Spring of 2005, when rates were skyrocketing and David Kirby published the book “Evidence of Harm,” a global wake up call that stirred great controversy and action. While some people became polarized in “debate” over varied facets of causation, others focused on autism recovery and the actuality that ASD is a full-body disorder, and that improved health, learning, and behavior was possible. That’s where Julie Matthews’ work fit in; she’d been studying/practicing nutrition and autism since 2001, and knew unquestionably that diet and nutrition could influence the trajectory of autism.

As a couple, choosing to be in life and “business” together, we committed to teaching and impacting others with the greatest of integrity. Knowing that autism was fraught with controversy, we opted to focus on sound science and common sense.

Julies_OriginalAutismPaperBy 2005 we’d distributed several hundred copies of Julie’s original research paper, titled: Autism: Biochemical Influences, Environmental concerns, Nutrition Intervention. Families and clients were so thankful that Julie had shared this information and provided such thought-out and researched guidance. The information was changing lives and we quickly learned it was powerful.

To reach more people we decided to turn the research paper into a book. But we felt that this knowledge tool required a powerful phrase to convey its value. So we created an intentional visioning session to give a power name to Julie’s interest and work. We wanted to convey:

  • Hope is real – recovery from autism is possible!
  • Attention to food/nutrition matters!
  • Abundant science supports doing this!
  • Just take action – it’s always worth it!

And with those intentions; through meditation, linguistic iterations, and thesaurus consultations – Julie blurted out “nourishing hope” – and our new world began!

The phrase summed up the “take away” of Julie’s research while simultaneously inspiring the most prudent recommendation. We know that…

  1. Autism (and related) is a full body disorder, varied systems and biochemistry are affected, and food and nutrition influence these systems, and…
  2. that specialized attention to the food and nutrition these children receive is warranted and beneficial. That’s ONE Empowering Idea!

nourishinghope_logoFrom that day, Julie and I (Martin, her husband and business partner) became dedicated to families of children with autism and other special needs. We support a global message of hope and have become the voice of children and families that understand the influence of food and nutrition upon the disorder of autism. Taking charge has helped their children improve and demonstrate potential that was previously unrevealed.

Whether choosing to omit using an artificially colored reinforcement treat, or following a full-on GFCF diet and making your own sauerkraut (or anywhere in between) – you are nourishing hope! And why not? Choosing food and nutrition strategically is a way of thinking and behaving that makes sense. Your actions aim to aid the body and improve its health and systemic functioning.

And for autism and related disorders, overwhelmingly, we know that scientific inquiry points us in the direction of strategic consideration of the food and nutrition people receive (i.e., following some specialized and personalized diet).

Are you nourishing hope?

18 Years of Empowering Families

 

NH_BookCover_IPPYIn the fall of 2005, after years in practice, at the Long Beach Defeat Autism Now! Conference, Julie gave their Director Maureen McDonnell a copy of newly titled “Nourishing Hope.” Things instantly clicked between Defeat Autism Now (DAN!) and Nourishing Hope, as Julie brought deep science and knowledge of the instrumental role of nutrition to the conversation about “autism diets.” Julie/Nourishing Hope championed the “diet/nutrition” message for their conferences for several years, also introducing live Cooking To Heal learning events at DAN! Conferences. See her introduction to a thousand parents here. Julie also spoke at Autism One, NAA, USAAA, Autism Society, and in Canada with Autism Today, and Australia with the Mindd Foundation several times. She and Martin launched their own live events too, holding one-day autism nutrition education workshops and creating Autism: Hope in Action conferences. Julie has shared the nourishing hope message in more than 60 cities around the world.

AF_RocketScienceInfJulie/Nourishing Hope has published scientifically referenced articles with the Autism File Magazine, the Price-Pottenger Foundation, and multiple other media sources. She’s appeared on countless radio programs, podcasts, television news programs, and even hosted her own live broadcast radio program in San Francisco for nine years. She’s been interviewed for documentaries, invited to expert panel discussions, contributed to major university research, and is routinely invited to speak at major conferences on autism, mental health, and beyond. Julie sits on several scientific advisory boards, championing the science and application of specialized diet and nutrition. She has motivated audiences of 15 to 1500.

In 2009, “Nourishing Hope for Autism” won an IPPY Award for “Most Progressive Health Book,” (press release here) and in 2013 Julie was honored by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals for her contribution to the field of holistic nutrition science.

In 2014, Julie/Nourishing Hope expanded efforts by launching advanced training in BioIndividual Nutrition for healthcare professionals. Though some nutritionists tout a singular dietary approach (diet dogma), Julie has always expressed that there is no one-size-fits-all diet – that customizing one’s diet and nutrition approach is essential. Julie directed her years of research and demonstrated methodology into a training course for leading edge professionals to teach the best of what she has learned. The mission of the BioIndividual Nutrition Institute is to establish the legitimacy of patient specific diet and nutrition protocols for the prevention and healing of all chronic health conditions. Julie has certified dozens of nutritionists, dietitians, integrative and functional medicine practitioners through her BioIndividual Nutrition program,

In 2018, “Julie Matthews – Nourishing Hope” appears alongside respected scientific researchers as “gold standard” evidence in published that supports the practice of improved diet and nutrition for autism (and much more!). You can read that study for free right here.

For nearly two decades, Nourishing Hope has been focused on informing and empowering families and clinicians that:

  • Scientific inquiry supports giving strategic attention to improved diet and nutrition for ADHD, Autism, and more.
  • Dietary improvements benefit every child
  • Cooking, shopping, etc.. is doable under nearly every circumstance

Nourishing Hope has touched families in 120 countries – tens of thousands have benefited by embracing this process. The concept and practice is universal. No matter the nation, culture, or perceived limitation, we routinely hear positive accounts of children improving by nourishing hope.

Today, the world knows more about the very things “Nourishing Hope” comprised years ago: hundreds of new studies being published corroborate Julie’s initial research including:

  • Influence of our environment
  • Common physiological, biochemical, and metabolic concerns
  • Benefit of diet/nutrition improvements

Are you nourishing hope?

Side note about Julie Matthews

10_Years_Of_Hope2Since her professional nutrition career began in 2002, 2020 marks a total of eighteen years that Julie’s been focused on helping children and families. Her knowledge and know-how was earned through YEARS of research/clinical experience and countless Saturdays as an allergen-free alchemist (i.e. chef) – in the kitchen, grocery store, or library, learning to “make it work” for even her most challenging clients.

Since the beginning, Julie has concurrently been focused on Nutrition for Healthy Pregnancy and Baby, putting all of her research, knowledge, and experience into teaching prevention/promoting health. And she’s practiced what she teaches – becoming pregnant at age 39 and delivering her healthy baby girl safe at home, with midwife, doula, and husband (me!) assisting.

Julie_taiko_cupertinoFew of you know that Julie is also an accomplished Fire Poi dancer – which is all about movement and flow – and can be done with lights or fire! Roller skater too! And she’s a Taiko performer, banging on huge Japanese drums. Her range of interests, passions, and talents is vast – stemming from I believe, a fundamental love of life, people, and happiness. As her husband, life companion, and business partner I cherish every day with her and remain committed to co-creating, sharing, and impacting the world together.

Do you believe that food and nutrition matter for autism? Have you experienced the influence of making a diet change? Are you nourishing hope?  Share your comments below.

Author: Martin Matthews

Parents Respond to Forbes Inaccurate Diet Article

Did you see the rebuttal I wrote to the Forbes article saying that the diet does not help autism and that we should “put to rest all of the claims that a gluten-free diet can somehow improve the symptoms of autism.” Their article discouraged all parents from trying diet intervention.

The biggest problem is that this Forbes writer seems not to have looked at the science beyond one current study that just came out.

In my rebuttal I lay out the science that shows diet does help autism, and how the ONE study he cited was flawed in two major ways. I couldn’t believe that someone would discourage parents from doing dietary intervention with their child based on one flawed study.

I have reached out to Forbes to see if they will publish my rebuttal or a scientific article on the subject of diet and nutrition intervention for autism.

Here is my email to their Corrections and Editorial departments/contacts: 

Attention Forbes Media, 

I’m writing regarding an article published in Forbes online on November 11, 2019 by one of your contributors, Steven Salzberg, entitled “New Autism Study: Gluten-free Diet Does Not Help Autistic Children.”

I believe your article to be inaccurate and I request that you publish corrections accordingly, including my expressed rebuttal.

You can read my response here: https://nourishinghope.com/forbes-article-ignores-abundant-science-on-gluten-free-for-autism/

In addition to the science explained, please note the dozens of comments from parents (and professionals) on how diet helped their children with autism.

As a professional Certified Nutrition Consultant working in this field for 17 years, I have written an award-winning book, published scientific research, and consulted and spoken with thousands of families, and I can say with certainty that your article is filled with misinformation. 

Your article is not only inaccurate, but it’s harmful to families who are looking for ways to help their children feel better. Your article spreads misinformation that discourages them from trying something that is shown to help, as there is plenty of scientific research supporting that diet improves autism symptoms and helps children.

I respectfully request that you correct the misinformation, and publish my rebuttal. 

Furthermore, I’m willing to submit to Forbes a scientifically referenced article on this subject if you are interested to publish it. I’m also open to engage with Mr. Salzberg in a forum where we can actively discuss the science of this subject together. 

I look forward to your response.

Respectfully,

Julie Matthews

I’m so tired of people who have clearly not examined the body of research, talked to a doctor on the front lines, or parents how have found benefit.

One mother really summed it up the naysayers really well, she said they often told her“ there was no science behind it, it was too expensive, and too hard.”

Sadly, this is not true. But I heard these reasons frequently. And that’s why I needed to write this rebuttal.

I asked parents and professionals to share their experiences in the comments section, to show other parents and Forbes that diet can and does help improve autism.

There are over 25 comments from parents and practitioners sharing their experience and that diet has helped their child or clients/patients.

Here are a few…

Yes, my son regressed into autism at 12 months and further at 15 months after an immune system assault. He developed horrible GI issues. At 21 months, we decided to go dairy free and within 1 day there was a noticeable difference in his interaction with us. We then went Gluten free and started seeing many improvements. Unfortunately, diet wasn’t enough to recover him, BUT it was the building block. And as you point out in your article, ONE bite does make a difference. We saw this about 2 months into the diet, when he managed to get 1 small piece of waffle and returned to a stim he had given up weeks before.
He is almost 15 and is completely recovered from autism, although he still has GI issues. I don’t believe we would have recovered him without the GF/CF diet and later SCD. I believe organic/non-GMO is essential as well. We have used GI meds and a variety of targeted biomedical interventions based on his physical presentations.

Thank you so much for providing information for parents! It was a parent blog that got me started on GF/CF years ago, even after several books written by doctors said there was no science behind it, it was too expensive and too hard. NO! It becomes one of the easiest and most basic interventions you can do.

Patti

I have twin boys who are two and a half and we have been on the gfcf diet for just over a month. I am seeing such amazing improvements in behaviour, hyperactivity and language and social skills. Everyone from intervention, family members, friends and play group teachers are commenting and noticing the difference in both of them since starting the diet changes. I also have Aspergers and have started the diet myself and have notice already that my brain feels less scattered and I can put thoughts together easier.

Thank you for giving us hope ❤️ It has really worked for us so far.

Stephanie

My son’s digestion was horrific before changing his diet. It wasn’t until we removed offending foods (gluten/dairy/soy/corn/refined sugar) that his digestion got better and that took about 3 years. He didn’t have a solid bowel movement until he was 11 years old. To say that diet doesn’t make a difference with ASD is absolutely false. Not only did his digestion change, his behavior did. He was no longer screaming in pain and he was became much calmer. You are what you eat as they say. Thank you Julie for putting the truth out there.

Kerry R.

Julie my daughter stopped hitting her head, hurting her knees and all other self-injury when we cleaned her diet, removing gluten, casein, sugar, soy. NOTHING ANYONE SAYS can counter that. Today, she’s a beautiful adult that speaks fluently 5 languages and is pursuing university. The low oxalate diet gave us a quality of life we could have only dreamed of. Keep doing what you are doing… parents need to hear correct information!

No amount of therapy would have given my daughter the chance of a productive beautiful life without the diet. Once her body started to function as it should and only then every therapy gave us gains and allowed her to become the woman she is today. Such a shame people feel entitled to judge something they have not lived. Thank you for your very vocal work!

Patricia G.

My autistic son barely spoke a word until we met with a functional medicine doctor, who immediately recommended a gluten, dairy and soy free diet. Within days of starting the GFDFSF diet, my son started talking and communicating. He is a chatterbox now compared to where he was before changing his diet. I would never let him go back to eating whatever.

Wendy

Oh yes, nutrition does matter!
Summer before last I had my granddaughter to tutor.
She was last in her class(1st).
She is a beautiful sweet girl but just zoned.
Teachers told my daughter, children like this never change.
I had her for about 5 weeks.
I detoxed her while cutting out gluten and most dairy.
I taught her for like… 30 mins 4 days a week for those 5 weeks.
When my daughter came and picked her up, the haze was gone from her eyes, she no longer grunted instead of talking, she was retested(same test she had when she left school) and now Aced the test! … And the teacher apologized to my daughter because she had never seen this happen to a child before.
Nutrition, suppliments, detox, no gluten and limited dairy.

Kim

Since the removal of dairy products and wheat products from my child diet, his overall health, behavior and social interaction has improved. Foods do affect our bodies.

Anne R.

Within 8 days of going dairy-free, my son with autism went from using a few words at a time to 4-word sentences. He became more aware of others and his environment. He called my father Grandpa for the first time. It was nothing short of amazing. I am now a health coach because I saw the power that food and nutrients had on my son, and I wanted to share that information with other families. I have seen many kids improve through a gluten and/or dairy-free diet. It costs nothing extra, with no side effects. It often starts families on path to other biomedical treatments and healthier eating. Why would anyone take away a parent’s hope with such a promising treatment? It is so frustrating as a parent to constantly have to defend what we’re doing. Thank for this article and for your help to give families a voice.

Sheila E.

Thank you for your rebuttal to this unfortunate article. As a parent of a child on the spectrum, I can say that many dietary interventions, including a GFCFSF diet, have helped my son immensely. As per the usual, main stream media is ignoring the abundant amount of science “on our side”, and ignoring parents who witness their children’s behavioral and physical changes (sounds like another area that I won’t mention here). I personally think the problem is that there is no money for big pharma to make in a “cure”, when a healthy diet is used to help and heal the body. So, they will do what they can to debunk actual science. Bravo for your response and for your amazing work. Parents: you can help heal your child with nutrition, there is hope. It may not be easy, but it is totally worth it!

Kristin F.

I’m so glad to see so many families have had such wonderful response to diet!

You can read the comments and responses yourself on the blog.

But I’m not surprised. I see it every day in my practice and online from parents that write to me.

We should be encouraging parents to strive for the healthiest diet their child can have, regardless if they have autism or not. At Nourishing Hope, we stand for the efficacy that diet and nutrition can improve autism.

Please share your comments on the Forbes rebuttal, or share my rebuttal on any group or social platform you can.

We want to nourish hope.

I want to counter this message from the naysayers with nourishing hope. And get the word out to parents with newly diagnosed children looking for answers and help.

To spread the truth, next week, I will be doing an online discussion where parents and practitioners can ask any questions they’d like about dietary intervention for autism.

Julie Matthews’ Email to Forbes Requesting Correction

I sent the following email to Forbes on December 5th in response to their inaccurate article on dietary intervention for autism.

Attention Forbes Media, 

I’m writing regarding an article published in Forbes online on November 11, 2019 by one of your contributors, Steven Salzber, entitled “New Autism Study: Gluten-free Diet Does Not Help Autistic Children.”

I believe your article to be inaccurate and I request that you publish corrections accordingly, including my expressed rebuttal.

You can read my response here: https://nourishinghope.com/forbes-article-ignores-abundant-science-on-gluten-free-for-autism/

In addition to the science explained, please note the dozens of comments from parents (and professionals) on how diet helped their children with autism.

As a professional Certified Nutrition Consultant working in this field for 17 years, I have written an award-winning book, published scientific research, and consulted and spoken with thousands of families, and I can say with certainty that your article is filled with misinformation. 

Your article is not only inaccurate, but it’s harmful to families who are looking for ways to help their children feel better. Your article spreads misinformation that discourages them from trying something that is shown to help, as there is plenty of scientific research supporting that diet improves autism symptoms and helps children.

I respectfully request that you correct the misinformation, and publish my rebuttal. 

Furthermore, I’m willing to submit to Forbes a scientifically referenced article on this subject if you are interested to publish it. I’m also open to engage with Mr. Salzberg in a forum where we can actively discuss the science of this subject together. 

I look forward to your response.

Respectfully,

Julie Matthews

Forbes has not responded back. So I have sent them another email. If you want to write to Forbes yourselves and share your experience or request for correction, you can write to them at [email protected] or [email protected]

Forbes article ignores abundant science on gluten-free for autism

This week an article was published in Forbes, disparaging the use of the gluten-free diet for autism – a healthful approach that has benefited thousands of families around the world for decades. 

The author’s “bent” seems to be to discourage parents of children with autism from giving needed attention to the food and nutrition their children receive. 

He states, “The science behind the idea that gluten or casein causes (or worsens) autism has always been sketchy.”

I so often hear there is “no science” or “little science”… or “weak” science, as this Forbes article states “weakly supportive evidence for this idea [following the gluten-free diet].”

When I see this claim of “no science” I know they have clearly not done the research because if they did they’d find dozens of studies that support the efficacy of dietary intervention for autism. (We’ll talk about some of them in a moment.)

I do what I do (write and speak), in part, because of these naysayers. I’m a Certified Nutrition Consultant who has worked with children with autism for 17 years. I’m a published nutrition researcher (with a study on diet and nutrition intervention for autism). And I’m a writer (author of Nourishing Hope for Autism and an online nutrition program for parents) that brings together the research and clinical results to help parents and health professionals distill the science and practice into things they can do to help children improve their health, learning, and behavior.

And I write and speak to not only help parents and practitioners learn how to help children, but also to give these parents a voice. A voice of the science and a voice for their experience and passion to help their child holistically and nutritionally.

The recent Forbes article is simply the latest hit piece on dietary intervention for autism.

Each year I see them. A study will come out showing diet does not help and another study showing that it does. The study showing benefit is often well designed and written but it gets no attention. And the study showing diet does not help gets all the press.

Why is this? 

Why is it that the media is much more likely to jump on a story showing that diet does not help autism, than when it does?

Why squash all hope? I may never understand this. 

At Nourishing Hope we are here for the opposite… to share the science AND nourish hope for families that there are things that can help. 

It’s solid science and it is certainly worth trying.

Let’s get into the article.

In this Forbes piece, the author, Steven Salzberg, a computer scientist, claims there hasn’t been a good study until now, saying…

“virtually no good studies have asked the question, do gluten-containing foods actually cause the symptoms of autism?”

That’s not true. There were a number of respected studies before this on gluten-free alone and many more on gluten and dairy. A quick Pub Med search brings up this study “ A Gluten-Free Diet as an Intervention for Autism and Associated Spectrum Disorders: Preliminary Findings”1 showing positive results way back in 1999.

The Old Switcheroo

Whether this is intentional or unconscious I’m not sure. But this is a common tactic many people use… Comparing apples to oranges

The author states, 

However, there are plenty of websites that offer treatments for autism, many of them unproven. One of the more common claims is that autistic children will benefit from a gluten-free, casein-free diet. 

But then he goes on to discuss only “gluten-free diets” which is not the primary dietary recommendation for those with autism. It is the gluten-free and casein-free diet (GFCF) these parents are following and seeing results from, not an ONLY gluten-free diet.  

He doesn’t consider or present any evidence on gluten-free AND casein-free diets. There is a vital distinction we’ll discuss when we talk about the study flaws. 

When he switches the conversation from gluten-free and casein-free to gluten-free only, he’s comparing apples to oranges. 

But first, more about the study.

One Study

The author only looked at one study2 to determine his primary scientific argument. He states:

“The new study, just published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, is the first randomized, well-controlled study of gluten-free diets in children with autism.”

No, it’s not the first (more studies below), and it was not well controlled. 

Let’s look at the study (you can read the full text paper here).

The study had 66 children who were all on a gluten-free diet. 

They were randomly assigned to the gluten-free diet (GFD) group or the gluten diet (GD) group. The gluten-free diet group continued to eat a gluten-free diet once the study started. The gluten diet group consumed one gluten containing food in more than one meal per day.

Flaws with the study

This article is based primarily on this one new study, which is fundamentally flawed in two ways.

1. The gluten free diet was not gluten-free

The study allows for infractions…

 “An incidental episode of consumption of a gluten-containing food (defined as a small piece of gluten product, e.g., bun or cake) or the consumption of yoghurt or spices with infinitesimal amounts of gluten was still classified as being compliant with the GFD.”

This is not a gluten-free diet to begin with. A biochemical response to gluten can occur from a very small infraction, the allowance of a “small piece of gluten product,” or even the small amount found in spices is definitely enough to cause a reaction. 

Since there was enough gluten to physiologically cause a reaction the study was not testing no gluten vs. gluten. It was actually testing a little gluten vs. more gluten, and this is very different. I’d expect not to see any/much difference between these two groups. 

Moreover, they don’t state how many infractions are allowed. We don’t know if they are happening daily or weekly. Regardless, even just a single infraction could throw things off for weeks, if not months. 

So the study cannot measure the impact of the omission of gluten. And this diet would not be able to determine the difference between gluten and gluten-free results. 

2. Dairy and Soy

The greatest flaw is that the diet discussed, a gluten-free diet, is not what’s being recommended by educated and experienced parents and professionals for autism. The science supports following a gluten-free AND casein-free diet.

That’s because casein, a protein in dairy (and soy too) share similar food proteins and properties to gluten (and similar scientific reasoning for removing them from the diet). Without omitting all three, you might not see any beneficial results.

This is because gluten and casein (and even soy) are broken down by the same digestive enzyme (DPPIV). So a deficiency with the enzyme can cause a reaction to all three foods. They are also inflammatory foods that are difficult for many people to digest. And all three have a partially-digested peptide that fits in the opiate receptor mimicking opiates. (I’ll explain more below)

Removing one may not result in any benefit.

In the Forbes article, the author quotes the lead researcher as saying, “There is no evidence either against or in favor of gluten avoidance for managing symptoms of ASD in children.”

I couldn’t find that quote in the paper, which concerns me on the legitimacy of the reporting. But either way, this statement is just wrong. Any pub med search will show you that there is plenty of research (which we will get into in this article).

Parent’s Reporting of Their Experience Matters

The author’s only mention of any past research was a single paper on parent interviews, which he defines as “weakly supportive evidence” and “notoriously unreliable.”

While parental surveys/interviews have their limitations – I disagree about their value. Parents know their children better than anyone. In that way, they can offer astute observations of changes in their child, and provide helpful data. 

And more importantly, this is only one paper. There are many more studies showing that a gluten-free and casein-free diet can help children with autism, and many that are more solid and well designed.

Studies that show the GFCF diet helps children with autism

Here are five studies showing that diet improves symptoms in autism:

  1. Showed a reduction of autistic behavior, increased social and communicative skills with a GFCF diet, and reappearance of autistic traits after the diet has been broken 3
  2. Found development was significantly better for the ASD group on a GFCF diet 4
  3. Demonstrated significant improvement in ASD and ADHD symptoms in children with autism on the GFCF diet 5
  4. Found 91% with autism improved behavior, speech, and/or GI to on GFCFSF 6
  5. Measured 4.5x improvement in developmental age, 6.7 pts increase in non-verbal IQ, improved autism symptoms, anxiety, and gastrointestinal symptoms from diet and nutrition intervention in autism. Same study found statistically significant benefits in communication, social interaction, daily living skills, inattention, and hyperactivity. (This study also included several nutritional supplements in addition to a healthy GFCFSF diet.) 7

The Science Behind Diet for Autism

As I mentioned at the beginning, the article states:

“The science behind the idea that gluten or casein causes (or worsens) autism has always been sketchy.” 

This is not true… the science is not sketchy.

Let’s talk science…

Children with autism routinely exhibit physical symptoms; such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating and GI pain, frequent infections, food allergies, sleeping challenges, and inflammation/ pain. For many children, nutrient deficiencies, imbalanced biochemistry, digestive problems, and inflammation underscore these symptoms.

Taking charge of their diet and nutrition can help.

One strategy is to follow a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, and soy-free diet.

Let’s discuss why the gluten-free and dairy-free diet can help.

What children eat affects how their body and brain operate for several reasons: the chemicals and substances in foods can affect the brain, and the foods we digest become nutrients for the brain to function.”

Nutrients are essential to all biochemical and brain function. Adequate nutritional status requires the consumption of nutrient dense food and proper digestion to breakdown and absorb those foods. Poor digestion can lead to a condition known as leaky gut; marked by malabsorption of nutrients, inflammatory responses to foods that are not broken down, and a burden to the detoxification system.

Poor digestion often stems from environmental factors (as well as genetic susceptibility), lack of beneficial bacteria, inflammation, and immune system response to certain foods. And studies have shown leaky gut 8, low levels of beneficial flora9, inflammation and immune response to food 10, 11 in children with autism. Additionally, the response to certain foods such as gluten and casein can create an opiate or inflammatory reaction that can affect the brain.

Gluten & Casein – Possible Opiates

Certain foods, such as wheat and dairy, contain proteins (gluten and casein) that can form opiate compounds if they are not properly digested. They fit in the opiate receptors of the brain and mimic other opiates like morphine12. This opiate effect can directly influence the brain and result in symptoms similar to morphine—foggy thinking, inattentiveness, constipation, and more.

And there are a number of studies on the opiates in autism 13, 14, 15,  a decrease in GI symptoms on a GFCF diet16, and a reduction in autistic symptoms with a GFCF diet 17, 18, 19.

As a parent addresses matters within their control, i.e. their child’s diet, nutrition, and lifestyle, they are literally supplying the body the nutrients and condition it needs to heal. Improving these underlying factors influences the trajectory of disorder and leads to better overall health and well being, and subsequently improved learning and behavior.

Misleading Inference – Diet and Vaccines?

You’d be amazed at how “controversial” DIET for children with autism is. 

That’s because so many people make it about vaccines. Which it is not. And this author does the same.

“The push for diet-based treatments has its origins in the anti-vaccine movement, beginning with… Andrew Wakefield” 

Oh boy, here we go. Hey, author, your bias is showing.

Do not politicize these poor children. Children are suffering. They need help. 

This is about gastrointestinal, neurological, and nutritional science.  Let’s figure out what’s going on and how we can improve the quality of life and their potential. 

Using Andrew Wakefield as the reason why diet doesn’t work is what’s really weak in this article.

The first observation by a doctor that a gluten-free and casein-free diet could help children with autism was done 40 years ago, well before Andrew Wakefield was on the scene.

The science of nutrition for autism is clear and has nothing to do with Andrew Wakefield or the “anti-vaccine movement.”

The Science is in and the Discussion is Over

That’s what this author wants you to believe…

He writes,“This study should put to rest all of the claims that a gluten-free diet can somehow improve the symptoms of autism.”

ONE study!. One flawed study should “put to rest all of the ‘claims’” and the research and clinical experience?

That’s silly. 

That’s not the scientific method. Putting to rest an entire intervention based on one poorly designed study is foolhardy. 

Unless your objective is less about finding the scientific answers and more about pushing a narrative.

In the end, it concludes with, 

“But let’s hope that parents get the message: don’t feed your autistic child a restricted diet.”

He hopes he’s taken away hope?

That’s terrible.

I’d be happy to talk with Steven Salzberg anytime to share the science on this subject. And I’d even be open for debate. Maybe Joe Rogan (my favorite podcaster) will have us both on to discuss the science of why and how diet helps children with autism improve.

Nourishing Hope

I founded Nourishing Hope to stand for the efficacy of improved diet and nutrition for autism. 

In my book, Nourishing Hope for Autism, my websites, and programs, I give hundreds of scientific references to support the scientific rationale for making improvements to diet and nutrition. I also provide detailed “how to” guidance to encourage success. 

And routinely, when families give it a try, they find it beneficial and worth the effort.

If you’re a parent, I’m here to say, keep nourishing hope. 

It is possible that improving diet and nutrition can help your child. 

Children can and do get better, and with 1 in 59 children affected by autism, THAT’s what Forbes should be writing about.

Share your story

Parents (and practitioners), share your comments. 

Show the naysayers that diet can help, and provide families hope.

With your comments AND the science on your side, maybe they will finally hear us.

Did a gluten-free, dairy-free or other diet help improve your child’s life? 

Please share your story (leave a comment below) with other parents looking for hope and help.

  1. Whiteley, P., Rodgers, J., Savery, D., & Shattock, P. (1999). A gluten-free diet as an intervention for autism and associated spectrum disorders: preliminary findings. autism, 3(1), 45-65.
  2. Piwowarczyk, A., Horvath, A., Pisula, E., Kawa, R., & Szajewska, H. (2019). Gluten-Free Diet in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blinded Trial. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 1-9.
  3. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Nodland M. (2001) Reports on dietary intervention in autistic disorders. Nutritional Neuroscience, 4(1):25-37.
  4. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Hoien T, Nodland M. (2002) A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutritional Neuroscience, 5(4):251-61
  5. Whiteley P, Haracopos D, Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Parlar S, Jacobsen J et al. The ScanBrit randomised, controlled, single-blind study of a gluten- and casein-free dietary intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Nutr Neurosci 2010; 13(2): 87-100.
  6. Jyonouchi, Harumi, Sining Sun, and Nanae Itokazu. “Innate immunity associated with inflammatory responses and cytokine production against common dietary proteins in patients with autism spectrum disorder.” Neuropsychobiology 46.2 (2002): 76-84
  7. Adams, J., Audhya, T., Geis, E., Gehn, E., Fimbres, V., Pollard, E., … & Matthews, J. (2018). Comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention for autism spectrum disorder—A randomized, controlled 12-month trial. Nutrients, 10(3), 369.
  8. D’Eufemia P, Celli M, Finocchiaro R, et al. Abnormal intestinal permeability in children with autism. Acta Paediatr. 1996 Sep;85(9):1076-9.
  9. Finegold SM et al. Gastrointestinal microflora studies in late-onset autism. Clin Infect Dis 2002 35(Suppl 1):S6-S16. 
  10. Jyonouchi H, et al. Proinflammatory and regulatory cytokine production associated with innate and adaptive immune responses in children with autism spectrum disorders and developmental regression. J Neuroimmunol. 2001 Nov 1;120(1-2):170-9.
  11. Jyonouchi H, Sun S, Itokazu N. Innate immunity associated with inflammatory responses and cytokine production against common dietary proteins in patients with autism spectrum disorder. Neuropsychobiology. 2002;46(2):76-84.
  12. Zioudrou, Christine, Richard A. Streaty, and Werner A. Klee. “Opioid peptides derived from food proteins. The exorphins.” Journal of Biological Chemistry 254.7 (1979): 2446-2449.
  13. Jinsmaa Y, Yoshikawa M. (1999) Enzymatic release of neocasomorphin and beta-casomorphin from bovine beta-casein. Peptides, 20:957-962.
  14. Reichelt KL, Knivsberg AM, Lihnd G, Nodland M: Probable etiology and possible treatment of childhood autism. Brain Dysfunction 1991; 4: 308-319.
  15. Shattock P, Whiteley P. (2002) Biochemical aspects in autism spectrum disorders: updating the opioid-excess theory and presenting new opportunities for biomedical intervention. Expert Opin Ther Targets. Apr;6(2):175-83
  16. Jyonouchi H, Geng L, Ruby A, Reddy C, Zimmerman-Bier B. (2005) Evaluation of an association between gastrointestinal symptoms and cytokine production against common dietary proteins in children with autism spectrum disorders. J Pediatr. May;146(5):582-4.
  17. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Nodland M. (2001) Reports on dietary intervention in autistic disorders. Nutritional Neuroscience, 4(1):25- 37.
  18. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Hoien T, Nodland M. (2002) A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syn- dromes. Nutritional Neuroscience, 5(4):251-61
  19. Whiteley P, Haracopos D, Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Parlar S, Jacobsen J et al. The ScanBrit randomised, controlled, single-blind study of a gluten- and casein-free dietary intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Nutr Neurosci 2010; 13(2): 87-100.

Learn How To Heal Autism – Free Online Educational Summit by Nourishing Hope

Anchored by a new scientific study by Arizona State University, 25 experts will convene over five days to empower families and healthcare practitioners to use food and nutrition to heal Autism

San Francisco, CA – June 30, 2018 – Nourishing Hope, a world leading authority on nutrition and dietary intervention for the healing of Autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, today announced that the organization is hosting The Nourishing Hope for Autism Summit, a free online event taking place July 30 – August 3, 2018. Please visit http://nourishinghopesummit.com/ for information and to register for this life-changing event.

“For many children, factors such as nutrient deficiencies, imbalanced biochemistry, and digestive problems play a significant role in causing or exacerbating Autism symptoms,” says Julie Matthews, Co-Founder of Nourishing Hope and a Certified Nutrition Consultant and Educator. “Nutrition can affect underlying biochemistry and physiological functioning to improve behavior and the symptoms associated with Autism.”

With Autism now affecting 1 in 59 children, Nourishing Hope wants families to know that natural, safe, and proven effective solutions can provide relief.

“The summit is about healing kids and nourishing hope in families through nutrition-based strategies,” continues Matthews.

The summit is groundbreaking because the Nourishing Hope process of healing from Autism is backed by a recent scientific study by Dr. James Adams, Director of the Autism/Asperger’s Research Program at Arizona State University. The study, co-authored Matthews, definitively proves that nutrition and dietary intervention do, in fact, significantly reduce the symptoms and behaviors associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Matthews concludes, “We’re bringing together leading researchers, medical doctors, and nutrition professionals to present the science, their clinical results, and steps parents can take at home to help their children with Autism. Over five days, five experts will discuss effective strategies and tactics, including simple changes in nutrition that can dramatically improve the lives of their children and/or patients living with autism. “I think of our summit as ‘Hope with An Action Plan.’”

The Nourishing Hope for Autism Summit is a free online event taking place July 30 – Aug 3, 2018. Please visit http://nourishinghopesummit.com/ for more information and to register for this one-of-a-kind event

About Nourishing Hope

For 16 years Nourishing Hope has provided scientifically based nutrition strategies that heal the symptoms and behaviors associated with Autism, ADHD, and other developmental delays. The organization’s proven methodology is practiced by families and healthcare providers around the world and is producing breakthrough results.

Contact

Peter Nilsson
[email protected]
858-880-5466

Arizona State University Study Proves That Nutrition And Dietary Intervention Effective At Improving Autism

Contrary to historical medical beliefs and public education and perception, new controlled twelve-month study shows that diet and nutritional intervention significantly improves the symptoms, cognition, digestive health, and behavior in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

San Francisco, CA – May 30, 2018 – Nourishing Hope, a world leading authority on nutrition and dietary intervention for the healing of Autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, today announced that a recent study by Dr. James Adams, Director of the Autism/Asperger’s Research Program at Arizona State University, co-authored by Julie Matthews of Nourishing Hope, definitively proves that nutrition and dietary intervention do, in fact, significantly reduce the symptoms and behaviors associated with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Dr. Adams’ study, published in a peer-reviewed journal, Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder (download study here), A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trialshows a direct and irrefutable correlation between nutrition and improvements in autism symptoms. Dr. Adams has published dozens of research papers over 15 years of investigating nutrition and autism, showing similar outcomes.

“The positive results of this study confirm that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is proven and effective in improving non-verbal IQ, Autism behaviors, developmental age, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD,” says Dr. Adams. “For 16 years Nourishing Hope has provided scientifically based nutrition strategies that help children and adults with autism around the world. Now, their founder Julie Matthews has contributed to this “gold standard” research study that substantiates their approach.”

The comprehensive nutrition approach significantly improved:

  • Cognitive function, 6.7 point increase in IQ
  • Developmental age increased by 18 months in the treatment group vs. 4 months in the non-treatment group
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms
  • Speech, sociability, irritability, hyperactivity, and more

Matthews adds, “The study also shows that no matter the age of the individual with autism, diet and nutrition intervention can help. It’s never too late to be nourishing hope!”

The study was a randomized controlled trial. A total of 117 individuals, aged 3 to 58, were enrolled in the study. 67 of the participants had been previously diagnosed with ASD; the remaining 50 participants were neuro-typical. Those with ASD were randomly assigned to a treatment group (37 participants) or a control group (30 participants) after having been physically examined by the study physician.

The study measured the effects of six nutritional interventions introduced over the course of a year, including supplementation and a healthy allergen-free diet.

Each of the interventions had already been studied individually, and demonstrated to be effective at improving autism symptoms. Researchers anticipated a synergistic effect from this comprehensive approach, and the results were substantial.

1 in 59 children are affected, and $137 Billion is being spent annually to support those with autism. It’s time for mainstream medicine and media to embrace Nourishing Hope’s proven and effective solutions and help every family living with Autism and related healthcare issues. The process is safe, natural, and provides what the human body requires most; quality food and individualized nutrition.

The organization is hosting a free online educational event titled Nourishing Hope for Autism Summit on July 30 – August 3. For more information and to register, visit www.NourishingHopeSummit.com.

About Nourishing Hope

For 16 years Nourishing Hope has provided scientifically based nutrition strategies that heal the symptoms and behaviors associated with Autism, ADHD, and other developmental delays. The organization’s proven methodology is practiced by families and healthcare providers around the world and is producing breakthrough results.

Contact

Peter Nilsson
[email protected]
858-880-5466

Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Research Study for Autism

After 16 years espousing the science and clinical efficacy of diet and nutrition for autism, I have become a published researcher!

I was part of a study that was just published last weekend, led by Dr. Jim Adams, that researched the benefits (and synergistic effects) of six diet and nutrition interventions for autism, over the course of a year. The results are astounding!

It states, “The positive results of this study suggest that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is effective at improving nutritional status, non-verbal IQ, autism symptoms, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD.”

This study validates nutritional intervention for autism, and paves the way for ALL families to receive nutrition support!!

It’s titled “Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder – A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial” and was published in the esteemed journal, Nutrients. It’s an open access journal so you can download and read the whole paper here.

The study showed a 4.5x increase in developmental age over the non-treatment group and a 7 point rise in IQ!!

There were improvements in:

  • Speech/communication
  • Sociability
  • Hyperactivity
  • Behavior
  • Autism symptoms
  • Sensory issues
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms.

We studied a comprehensive diet and nutrition intervention for autism – which consisted of 6 nutrient and diet interventions. My role was to help participants understand and follow a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, soy-free diet. I worked alongside my colleague, Dana Laake. Together we created and delivered an educational presentation and conducted one-on-one nutrition consultations.

The study measured the effects of six interventions over the course of a year. Here’s when each were introduced:

  • Day 0: Vitamin/Mineral supplementation
  • Day 30: Essential Fatty Acid supplementation
  • Day 60: Epsom salt baths
  • Day 90: Carnitine supplementation
  • Day 180: Digestive Enzyme supplementation
  • Day 210: Healthy, gluten-free, casein-free diet
  • Day 365 – Final assessment

These interventions were chosen because each of them had already been studied individually, and found to be effective. And “the goal of this study is to investigate a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention to treat children and adults with ASD”… and “to investigate the effect of the combination of those treatments in a long-term study.”

Researchers expected their effects to be synergistic. And it appears they were, given the outstanding results of the study! Some of which I shared yesterday around increases in developmental age, IQ, autism and digestive symptoms.

Here are three very interesting cases from the study that deserved additional mention because the results were incredible!

  • 7-year-old boy with pica was healed entirely within one week of starting the HGCSF (healthy gluten-free casein-free soy-free) diet.
  • 27-year-old male with severe ASD and a history of severe urinary retention requiring daily catheterization was able to urinate on his own about 4 days after eliminating dairy products. By the end of the study, the young man no longer needed catheterization and had zero episodes of kidney stones, urinary tract or bladder infections.
  • One 9-year-old girl with severe ASD had poor strength, endurance, and energy levels at the beginning of the study. Four months after the treatment, she no longer needed her wheelchair. We found out that her pre-treatment diet was deficient in carnitine due to total avoidance of beef products.

The study had a wide age range, from 3-58 and measured improvements in all ages – showing diet and nutrition is helpful regardless of age or gender! It’s never too late to be nourishing hope!

According to parents, the interventions that were most effective were:

  • Multivitamin/mineral formula
  • Essential fatty acid supplement
  • Healthy GFCFSF diet

And 85% or more planned to continue with the vitamin/mineral formula and the essential fatty acid supplement. And a majority planned to continue with the gluten-free, casein-free and soy-free diet and the epsom salt baths, as they found these nutritional interventions to be helpful and worthwhile.

This study validates using a comprehensive diet and nutrition strategy to support improvements in health, learning, and behavior in those with autism, I call this approach “nourishing hope.”

The most frustrating thing I hear from parents at conferences is “no one told me.” They were never informed that diet and nutrition matter, that their daily choices could make such a difference. In fact, they may have been erroneously told that “diet doesn’t help” or “there’s no science to it.”

Truth is, there IS science behind it. Hundreds of studies support an overall scientific rationale for using food and nutrition to be help improve symptoms. This has been my message to families for years…

Autism can be improved, and food matters.

I love my autism families. I know nutrition makes a positive difference. And I want to help. That’s why I’ve committed my career to knowing as much as I can about the underlying biochemistry of autism and how to make strategic diet and nutrition choices that help – and teaching what I know to you – parents and practitioners alike – so that you can make the most from this approach.

Thanks for being on this journey with me.

Sincerely, Julie

SaveSave

Autism Nutrition Study Announcement!

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Did you hear the exciting news? A huge dream of mine has come true!

After 16 years espousing the science and clinical efficacy of diet and nutrition for autism, I have become a published researcher!

I was part of a study that was just published last weekend, led by Dr. Jim Adams, that researched the benefits (and synergistic effects) of six diet and nutrition interventions for autism, over the course of a year. The results are astounding!

It states, “The positive results of this study suggest that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is effective at improving nutritional status, non-verbal IQ, autism symptoms, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD.”

This study validates nutritional intervention for autism, and paves the way for ALL families to receive nutrition support!!

It’s titled “Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder – A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial” and was published in the esteemed journal, Nutrients. It’s an open access journal so you can download and read the whole paper here.

The study showed a 4.5x increase in developmental age over the non-treatment group and a 7 point rise in IQ!!

There were improvements in:

  • Speech/communication
  • Sociability
  • Hyperactivity
  • Behavior
  • Autism symptoms
  • Sensory issues
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms.

We studied a comprehensive diet and nutrition intervention for autism – which consisted of 6 nutrient and diet interventions. My role was to help participants understand and follow a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, soy-free diet. I worked alongside my colleague, Dana Laake. Together we created and delivered an educational presentation and conducted one-on-one nutrition consultations.

The study measured the effects of six interventions over the course of a year. Here’s when each were introduced:

  • Day 0: Vitamin/Mineral supplementation
  • Day 30: Essential Fatty Acid supplementation
  • Day 60: Epsom salt baths
  • Day 90: Carnitine supplementation
  • Day 180: Digestive Enzyme supplementation
  • Day 210: Healthy, gluten-free, casein-free diet
  • Day 365 – Final assessment

These interventions were chosen because each of them had already been studied individually, and found to be effective. And “the goal of this study is to investigate a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention to treat children and adults with ASD”… and “to investigate the effect of the combination of those treatments in a long-term study.”

Researchers expected their effects to be synergistic. And it appears they were, given the outstanding results of the study! Some of which I shared yesterday around increases in developmental age, IQ, autism and digestive symptoms.

Here are three very interesting cases from the study that deserved additional mention because the results were incredible!

  • 7-year-old boy with pica was healed entirely within one week of starting the HGCSF (healthy gluten-free casein-free soy-free) diet.
  • 27-year-old male with severe ASD and a history of severe urinary retention requiring daily catheterization was able to urinate on his own about 4 days after eliminating dairy products. By the end of the study, the young man no longer needed catheterization and had zero episodes of kidney stones, urinary tract or bladder infections.
  • One 9-year-old girl with severe ASD had poor strength, endurance, and energy levels at the beginning of the study. Four months after the treatment, she no longer needed her wheelchair. We found out that her pre-treatment diet was deficient in carnitine due to total avoidance of beef products.

The study had a wide age range, from 3-58 and measured improvements in all ages – showing diet and nutrition is helpful regardless of age or gender! It’s never too late to be nourishing hope!

According to parents, the interventions that were most effective were:

  • Multivitamin/mineral formula
  • Essential fatty acid supplement
  • Healthy GFCFSF diet

And 85% or more planned to continue with the vitamin/mineral formula and the essential fatty acid supplement. And a majority planned to continue with the gluten-free, casein-free and soy-free diet and the epsom salt baths, as they found these nutritional interventions to be helpful and worthwhile.

This study validates using a comprehensive diet and nutrition strategy to support improvements in health, learning, and behavior in those with autism, I call this approach “nourishing hope.”

The most frustrating thing I hear from parents at conferences is “no one told me.” They were never informed that diet and nutrition matter, that their daily choices could make such a difference. In fact, they may have been erroneously told that “diet doesn’t help” or “there’s no science to it.”

Truth is, there IS science behind it. Hundreds of studies support an overall scientific rationale for using food and nutrition to be help improve symptoms. This has been my message to families for years…

Autism can be improved, and food matters.

I love my autism families. I know nutrition makes a positive difference. And I want to help. That’s why I’ve committed my career to knowing as much as I can about the underlying biochemistry of autism and how to make strategic diet and nutrition choices that help – and teaching what I know to you – parents and practitioners alike – so that you can make the most from this approach.

Thanks for being on this journey with me.

Sincerely, Julie

Nourishing Hope PERU 2016

In April, Julie Matthews traveled to South America to educate Doctors and Nutritionists and share her knowledge and experience using diet and nutrition to support those with autism and related disorders. She presented at Tratamientos Biomedicos Para El Espectro Autista (Biomedical Treatments for Autism Spectrum). Special thanks to Dr. Leticia Shaw and The Great Plains Laboratory for inviting Julie to present in Peru.

After the conference Julie and her family took some time to explore Lima, then to journey to Macchu Picchu. We spent time in the Sacred Valley visiting ancient Inca ruins, exploring the incredible geography, enjoying local food and crafts, and meeting terrific people. The view – of course – was spectacular.

Check out our slide show of Nourishing Hope in Peru.


[wppa type=”slide” album=”1″ size=”600″ align=”center”]Any comment[/wppa]

Autism Recovery in ACTION – Nourishing Hope & Generation Rescue


Julie Matthews is so excited to be speaking at the Generation Rescue autism conference later this month in Dallas – that’s she’s giving away $700 worth of her educational products to every family in attendance.

AutismRecoveryInAction

The Autism Education Summit informs parents and doctors that autism is a physiological condition; that the entire body is affected, and that an integrative healthcare approach helps children tremendously!

AES_2015

In Dallas, Julie will explain the scientific rationale for specialized diet and nutrition – which has shown to help children with autism. She will teach best practices for identifying, getting started, and ensuring good nutrition for kids – even picky eaters. Julie will also present results from a recent 12-month university study she was involved with, that scientifically demonstrated that nutritional intervention is 5x more beneficial to the development of children with autism (Dr. James Adams, ASU 2015 – CLICK for Video about this Study).

“Intervention” Benefits Children

For ten years now, Generation Rescue has advanced awareness that recovery from autism is possible, that diet/nutrition changes are routinely “step one” on the journey.

Health and behavioral improvements are what parents report most when taking charge of their children’s diet and nutrition. For parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers, igniting hope through their own empowered choices and actions motivates further discovery of helpful options. Jenny McCarthy’s public awareness efforts and Generation Rescue’s outreach campaigns were fueled by improvements noted in Jenny’s son Evan, when making strategic changes to his diet and nutrition regime.

FREE_EducationAndLearningTools

Recovery In Action: Nourishing Hope Learning Tools GIVEAWAY

After 15 years researching, practicing, and championing the message that food matters for autism; Julie finds it imperative to give families reason, encouragement, and support at nourishing hope in their own homes.

Every child deserves opportunity, which is why Generation Rescue works so hard to inform and empower parents with life-changing knowledge and resources. On behalf of every autism parent that’s learned that more is possible for their child, Julie aims to encourage new families to embrace nourishing hope. This conference serves as catalyst for autism recovery awareness and action.

If they want them, every family that attends the Autism Education Summit in Dallas will get a set of diet and nutrition educational tools from Julie Matthews – plus a nutrition resource list including the specific, safe and effective methods used in Dr. James Adams’ recent study at Arizona State University.

The GIVEAWAY includes:

  • The slides from Julie’s Autism Education Summit presentation
  • Julie’s eBook: Using Food and Nutrition to Improve ADHD and Autism
  • Julie’s Step-by-Step to GFCF Success & Allergen-free Travel Cards
  • Cooking To Heal – Julie’s Cookbook and Demonstration Videos
  • The Nourishing Hope Food Pyramid
  • Julie’s 4-hour Live “Autism Diet Success” Workshop
  • Complete Set of Nourishing Hope Support Club Sessions – 27 one-hour Learning Modules
Julie Matthews/Annie Sidner
Julie Matthews and Annie Sidner

To receive these digitally delivered educational resources: Families can sign up while at the Autism Education Summit. Attend Julie’s presentation, or locate Julie Matthews or Annie Sidner anytime during the conference.  To participate and receive the tools:

  1. We request that families join our Facebook group; connect with others from this Conference Group, and share their experiences from the Autism Education Summit and nourishing hope over the next year.
  2. We ask that you buy/read “Nourishing Hope for Autism”
    • Get it at Amazon.com, then later please leave feedback about the book
BROADER Giveaway AVAILABLE soon!
Julie is so committed to helping children that we’re going to make this SAME Giveaway available to another 100 Families via the Nourishing Hope website – watch for details and how to apply for this giveaway shortly.
Come say Hello in Dallas!
Julie and Martin Matthews
Nourishing Hope
Martin_Matthews_NH_TableSign

BENourishingHope