Kids Love Liver!

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Believe it or not – and most parents do not – kids love liver!  In my experience of working with thousands of children with autism (some of the pickiest eaters), overwhelmingly they love my Burgers with Liver. For you squeamish parents out there, why eat liver? Liver is rich in many nutrients.  Because its an organ with so many jobs, the liver stores a large number of nutrients for its many needs. Liver from chicken, beef, lamb, or an grass-fed or pastured animal contains high levels of iron, vitamin B12, folate, vitamins A & C, and zinc. In the spirit of wanting more families to eat liver, I’d like to share my kid-approved “Burgers with Liver” recipe from Cooking to Heal with you.  I know this dish may not sound tasty but these burgers are delicious.  Time and time again, parents tell me that their kids say, “These are the best burgers ever!”   No one will know they are eating liver.

Burgers with Liver

Diet Compliance: GFCF/SCD/LOD/FG/Egg-Free/Nut-Free Make it FG (Feingold) without herbs and spices except salt.
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • ¼-1/3 cup ground liver (put liver in food processor and blend until smooth) about 2-3 oz.  Avoid any liver that is not thoroughly blended
  • 1-2 teaspoons onion powder
  • Rosemary, white pepper, or other herb or spice (white pepper is lower oxalate)
  • Salt, dash
Mix together and form into patties.  Cook as usual – in a pan, on the grill, or as desired.  I prefer cooking them until they are well done.

WATCH Julie & Polly Making LIVER BURGERS on Autism Mother’s TV

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Julie Matthews is a Certified Nutrition Consultant who received her master’s degree in medical nutrition with distinction from Arizona State University. She is also a published nutrition researcher and has specialized in complex neurological conditions, particularly autism spectrum disorders and ADHD for over 20 years. Julie is the award winning author of Nourishing Hope for Autism, co-author of a study proving the efficacy of nutrition and dietary intervention for autism published in the peer-reviewed journal, Nutrients, and also the founder of BioIndividualNutrition.com. Download her free guide, 12 Nutrition Steps to Better Health, Learning, and Behavior.

References for this article:

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2 Comments

  1. Great Idea! I’m going to give it a try. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

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