Ruby’s Fourth of July Smoothie Bowl

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Holidays are great opportunities to encourage our kids to join us in the kitchen to prepare festive foods and also take the lead on making their own recipes.

I am so proud of my daughter, Ruby. She created a smoothie bowl for the Fourth of July! She figured out a plan of the ingredients she was going to need, determined amounts for each ingredient, wrote out the recipe, and with our supervision, used the blender to create this healthy, delicious, and festive treat for the 4th! She even made the video above and edited it herself.

It can be customized to fit with various diets. You can change the milk to whatever works best for your dietary and nutritional needs. The fruits can also be varied. Just make sure they are frozen to give you that ice cream-like texture so that the red, white, and blue toppings stay on top!

No matter what your plans on July Fourth, eating healthy can be fun and in this case even patriotic!

We hope you and your children will enjoy making this healthy, festive treat!

Happy Fourth of July from the Nourishing Hope team!

Share your 4th of July creations with us in the comments below.

Julie Matthews is a Certified Nutrition Consultant who received her master’s degree in medical nutrition with distinction from Arizona State University. She is also a published nutrition researcher and has specialized in complex neurological conditions, particularly autism spectrum disorders and ADHD for over 20 years. Julie is the award winning author of Nourishing Hope for Autism, co-author of a study proving the efficacy of nutrition and dietary intervention for autism published in the peer-reviewed journal, Nutrients, and also the founder of BioIndividualNutrition.com. Download her free guide, 12 Nutrition Steps to Better Health, Learning, and Behavior.

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