Low Oxalate Diet

What are oxalates?

Oxalate is an antinutrient found in plants, where they have a number of functions, one of which is to deter animals from eating their leaves. They tend to be bound to calcium, so many high calcium foods, like spinach, are also high in oxalate.

High oxalate levels in the body can be a problem. Oxalates can lead to malnutrition, and can deposit throughout the body causing inflammation. Oxalates are most known for their role in  creating kidney stones, however, the latest scientific research shows us even people without kidney stones can have problems with oxalates. Researchers found high oxalate levels in the individuals with autism, all who had normal kidney function. 

Oxalates have been linked to:

  • Inflammation (and activation of the inflammasome)
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • microbiome imbalance
  • Slow growth in children
  • Pain
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Chronic disease 
  • Autism

There are a number of reasons for high oxalates in the body. Normally, your gut microbiome deals with oxalates, but an imbalance in your gut bacteria and digestive disorders can lead to higher oxalate levels. Additionally, digestion of fats, vitamin and mineral levels, and individual biochemistry all affect oxalate levels.

Low Oxalate Diet

The low oxalate diet is designed to restrict the intake of high oxalate foods (not eradicate oxalates from the diet completely). Instead, the diet concentrates on limiting exposure where possible. The low oxalate diet is a helpful tool to use alongside diets like GFCFSF or SCD to fine-tune an individual’s diet. 

Foods high in oxalate include: Spinach, swiss chard, nuts, some seeds, legumes, grains, certain fruits, beets, sweet potatoes, chocolate.

And the low oxalate diet can be helpful when oxalates are the cause of symptoms and underlying factors. 

Also, be aware oxalates can also be produced inside the body (e.g. endogenously), so in addition to a low oxalate diet, other factors should be understood and considered such adequate levels of nutrients (such as B6), avoidance of certain supplements and foods that (while not high in oxalate) can convert to oxalate.  

 If you are considering a low oxalate diet, research oxalates, plan your approach before beginning, and go slowly. It’s important not to remove oxalates too quickly.

Explore our low oxalate diet recipes below. Be sure to read all of the instructions before beginning in case diet-compliant substitutions are described in the introduction.

Your child is unique and so are their diet and nutritional needs. Learn how personalized nutrition can help your child today. Download our guide: “12 Nutrition Steps to Better Health, Learning, and Behavior.”

Low Oxalate Diet Recipes

Low Carb Cauliflower Tortillas

Low Carb Cauliflower Tortillas

Avoid pepper for LOD and FG. Ingredients 1 head of cauliflower 3 eggs ½ teaspoon salt Black pepper (optional) Directions Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Wash cauliflower, cut cauliflower chunks off base stem/leaves. Put cauliflower in food processor and process until a...

Rutabagas – The Hidden Gem for Most Special Diets

Rutabagas – The Hidden Gem for Most Special Diets

The Rutabaga, also known as a swede, Swedish turnip (though distinctly different than a turnip), and neep (in Scotland).  Rutabagas are root vegetables and a member of the cruciferous or brassica family, which includes broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts,...

Rutabaga Fries

Rutabaga Fries

This is a great recipe because it’s compatible with so many diets. To make it low salicylate or SAG, use ghee or sunflower oil. For 100% dairy-free, avoid ghee. For keto, eat sparingly. Ingredients 3-4 Rutabagas Ghee or expeller-pressed coconut oil Salt Directions...

Chicken Nuggets

Chicken Nuggets

Egg-Free Chicken Nuggets   GFCFSF/Low Oxalate/Low Salicylate, Egg-Free, and Nut-Free Use white vinegar for low salicylate. Ingredients Chicken breasts or thighs 2/3 cup GF flour (I use 2/3 brown rice flour and 1/3 potato starch or tapioca starch or a combo of...

Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving Turkey

     The turkey is usually the star of your Thanksgiving show! Many traditional recipes can be converted for food allergies or intolerances. Here is an easy guide for a perfect bird! Let’s start by discussing how much turkey you will need to buy and how to...

Ground Beef Stuffed Zucchini (Zucchin-izza)

Ground Beef Stuffed Zucchini (Zucchin-izza)

We continue the food and garden chronicles here at Nourishing Hope. Our garden, to say the very least, has been a place of comfort, fun, learning, memories, and deliciousness for me and my family.  I know there can be some intimidation around starting a garden. But...

Summer Grilling: Kid-Friendly Vegetables on the BBQ

Summer Grilling: Kid-Friendly Vegetables on the BBQ

Most dads love a good barbeque. If you’re a dad planning a barbeque, or a mom creating a fun day for the dad in your family’s life, I’ve got some ideas for you! When you think of BBQ, I’m sure most of you are thinking of meat. But vegetables can be delicious on the...

Coconut Pancakes (Grain-Free Recipe)

Coconut Pancakes (Grain-Free Recipe)

GFCF/SCD/GAPS/LOD, Nut-free Ingredients ¼ cup, (plus 1 Tablespoon) coconut flour ¼ teaspoon unrefined salt ¼ teaspoon baking soda 4 large or 5 medium pastured eggs (room temperature) 2 Tablespoons of coconut milk or other diet compliant non-dairy milk 1 teaspoon...

Sauerkraut Recipe

Sauerkraut Recipe

GFCF/SCD/GAPS/Paleo/LOD/BED/Keto Diet Compliance Sauerkraut is wonderful for digestion and the immune system. It’s also beneficial for our mood.  Sauerkraut is made with fermented or cultured cabbage and other vegetables. When they are made raw, the traditional way,...

Crispy Kale Chips Recipe

Crispy Kale Chips Recipe

Our family loves kale chips, including my daughter. And not only are the delicious, they are very nutritious. Kale is the cruciferous, or brassica family, along with other powerhouse foods like broccoli, brussels sprouts, and cabbage.  Kale Nutrition Kale...